"Tune-Up" by Miles Davis

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"Tune-Up" by Miles Davis

Postby djangology » Tue Mar 04, 2003 8:14 am

I was listening to the Patrick Sassois version of this tune (on the first Alma Sinti album) and fell in love. Has anyone got a better chart than the one I find on Song Trellis ( http://www.songtrellis.com/ ) ?

(The real reason I am posting this is so that I can claim my first post. :) )
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Song trellis

Postby Jan Primus » Tue Mar 04, 2003 6:49 pm

That is a pretty cool site. I need to spend more time not so much quanitfying what I know and hear, but increasing my awareness of it and how it relates to my music.
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Re: "Tune-Up" by Miles Davis

Postby TedGottsegen » Wed Mar 05, 2003 1:09 am

djangology wrote:I was listening to the Patrick Sassois version of this tune (on the first Alma Sinti album) and fell in love.


You aren't the only one! It is one of my favorite Alma Sinti tunes and the other tunes that they have recorded that are similar ("The Song is You") just doesn't match up. This looks like a pretty good chart, although am I crazy or does it seem that there is no "B" section?
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Postby djangology » Fri Mar 07, 2003 7:50 am

I found a text version chart of this tune, although I haven't tried it or compared it to the other one on song trellis. I'll get to it later.

Tune-Up, Miles Davis, Key of D, 4/4

[: Em7 | A7 | Dmaj7 | Dmaj7 |
| Dm7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 |
| Cm7 | F7 | Bbmaj7 | Bbmaj7 |
| Em7 | A7 | Bb7 | A7 |

| Em7 | A7 | Dmaj7 | Dmaj7 |
| Dm7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 |
| Cm7 | F7 | Bbmaj7 | Bbmaj7 |
| Em7 | A7 | Dmaj7 | Dmaj7 :]
Last edited by djangology on Wed Jun 25, 2003 12:31 am, edited 5 times in total.
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Postby justjack » Fri Mar 07, 2003 8:48 am

'Ology,

Let us know where you found it, if only for future reference. In the meantime, I'm still looking for other charts for you. Cheers.
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Postby Rich » Sun Apr 13, 2003 11:17 am

anyone know what sort of plectrums Miles Davis used? :P
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Postby Teddy Dupont » Sun Apr 13, 2003 3:25 pm

Rich wrote:anyone know what sort of plectrums Miles Davis used? :P


Excellent question Rich. I'll do some checking and get back to you.
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Miles to go

Postby Jan Primus » Mon Apr 14, 2003 3:29 pm

Well since he was a trumpet picker I would venture to say he used the liplectrums. There is some controversy as to weather it was a Dugain, Dunlop or Wegen.
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Postby djangology » Sat Jun 21, 2003 3:54 am

Its interesting that this 1953 Miles Davis tune stuck out to me when I first heard it. Besides resembling the melody to the TV show "The Price Is Right" is seems that this is one of the first tunes ever written to the rules of the ii - V concept. After further research, I found that this song forms the basis for what became "Coltrane Changes", which Coltrane displayed in the tunes "Countdown" and "Giant Steps".

(in D major) | Em7 F7 | Bbmaj7 Db7 | Gbmaj7 A7 | Dmaj7 |.

We all know about the ii - VI - V - 1 progression in the first 8 bars of "rhythm changes". This one by Miles Davis is probably just as important.

Mabye I have an ear after all for jazz? Now that I have learned this bit of trivia, i'm happy that my unbiased ear noticed this one.
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Postby Scot » Sat Jun 21, 2003 1:43 pm

Just for the record, it's been accepted for years that "Tune-Up" was actually written by Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson.
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Postby Shepoid » Sat Jun 21, 2003 1:55 pm

Scot:
Would your statement's information come from the same "Accepted" folks who claim Hoagy Charmicial really stole "Stardust". LOL :roll:
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Postby Scot » Sat Jun 21, 2003 3:42 pm

Shep
I did not say that Miles "stole" this tune. Let's say he mistakenly received credit for it - reference http://www.vervemusicgroup.com/impulse/ ... p?aid=2952. There are many other references to this in jazz literature.
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Postby Shepoid » Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:05 pm

Scot:
I went to the link and it's all the same pant-load of Ken Burns crap.
To say that Bill Evans wrote Blue in green in mind bogling given the fact that the album was completly wriitten by miles and Bill Evans wrote the liner notes. I will not argue with you. If you want to believe revisionist history, so be it. Join in with the rest of the liberal, racist, nit witted musicoligist bottom feeders.
All the best to you too.
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Postby djangology » Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:53 pm

im not saying either one of you are right because I never read the book, but http://allmusic.com says this: "Vinson's jazz leanings were probably heightened during 1952-1953, when his band included a young John Coltrane. Somewhere along about here, Vinson wrote two Miles Davis classics, "Tune Up" and "Four." "

so this suggests that Tune-Up was influenced by Coltrane himself probably? it sounds like all 3 of these guys were probably sitting around experimenting and came up with all this stuff together, sorta like the French Impressionists all came up with their ideas together (Monet, Renoir, Degas, Manet, Sisley and Cezanne)

hey, does anyone know any other important changes besided "Rhythm" and "Coltrane Changes" ?
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Postby Scot » Sat Jun 21, 2003 5:18 pm

Whoa! I express a widely-held opinion (that was around way before anyone ever heard of Ken Burns)and somehow I am now a racist bottom feeder? Please explain. Vinson was black himself - and though I did not see any of Burns' magnum opus, the impression I got (from others) was that rather than giving white folks too much credit, he didn't give them enough. And it's not like the world is trying to snatch Miles' entire body of work - it's just a couple of tunes.

I totally don't understand the venom in your reply, Shep.

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